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Truck Driver Shortage Means Thousands of Jobs Need to be Filled

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Source: Local8Now.com/home/headlines/
Need-a-job-Look-at-truck-driving--299279331.html

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) -- A national shortage of truck drivers means companies are looking to fill tens of thousands of jobs in the coming years.

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At the Tennessee Truck Driving School in Louisville, CDL Instructor Sean Henson said they typically train 400 to 500 new drivers every year. But that doesn't come close to filling the gap for what's needed.

Henson said there are several reasons for the shortage of drivers. The biggest is that the average age of current drivers is between 55 and 65 and more drivers retire every year than what come into the business. He also said that the improving economy means there is more stuff being built and nearly all that product is moved by trucks... Continue reading.

Source: Local8Now.com/home/headlines/Need-a-job-Look-at-truck-driving--299279331.html

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Driving Skill Outweighs Classroom Time for New Truckers, Training Experts Say

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By Jonathan S. Reiskin, Associate News Editor
This story appears in the March 23 print edition of Transport Topics.
Source: ttnews.com/articles/basetemplate.aspx?storyid=37704

Getting students to demonstrate competence at necessary skills is a better way to train future truck drivers compared with setting standards for hours logged in classrooms, several driver-training professionals said during a Transport Topics Web broadcast.

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The Commercial Vehicle Training Association, which represents driver-training schools, also backs performance-based standards, said Donald Lefeve, its president.

“CVTA led the fight against hourly standards [the basis of the 2007 training rule]. Hours trained is not related to safety,” he said. One of Lefeve’s vice presidents also is on the FMCSA advisory committee... Continue reading.

Source: ttnews.com/articles/basetemplate.aspx?storyid=37704

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Replay: LiveOnWeb Spotlight on Driver Training

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Source: ttnews.com/articles/basetemplate.aspx?storyid=37552

An FMCSA committee will be meeting March 19 to try to craft a rule on minimum training standards for entry level commercial vehicle drivers.

One day before that meeting, two people who are closely connected to that decision-making process joined us for a special LiveOnWeb focused on Driver Training.

Committee member Boyd Stephenson of American Trucking Associations, and Don Lefeve, president of the Commercial Vehicle Training Association... Continue reading.

Source: ttnews.com/articles/basetemplate.aspx?storyid=37552

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Trucking Hopeful CDL Committee Will Set Standards, Improve Rulemaking Process - Includes CVTA CEO, Don Lefeve's Comments

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by in Running Lights
Source: fleetowner.com/blog/trucking-hopeful-cdl-committee
-will-set-standards-improve-rulemaking-process

As far as federal government acronyms go, ELDTAC is standard issue and unwieldy. Many in trucking, however, are hopeful that those six letters will help spell out a long-overdue driver training standard—and might even lead the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) toward a user-friendly revamp of the way regulations are developed.

ELDTAC stands for the Entry-Level Driver Training Advisory Committee, and its members have been recently chosen by FMCSA from a field of experts in their respective fields, including motor carriers, drivers, DMV training organizations, state enforcement agencies, labor unions, and safety advocacy groups.

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Don Lefeve, president of the Commercial Vehicle Training Association, says now that the basics are out of the way, the committee must “roll up their sleeves and get down to work.”

“I believe the participants understand the tough task ahead and realize that we need to produce a rule,” Lefeve said. “While there are many challenges which lie ahead, the first session ended on a positive note. I remain optimistic the committee will be able to produce a rule by the end of May... Continue reading.

Source: fleetowner.com/blog/trucking-hopeful-cdl-committee-will-set-standards-improve-rulemaking-process

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Troops to Trucks

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CDL school helps America’s veterans get behind the wheel of the big rigs.

BY CECIL GUY

This article appears in the March 2015 print edition of GI Jobs. Click here to visit GI Jobs for more info.

Back in 2013 I wrote about a veteran, Matt Sanchez, who was enrolled at the National Tractor Trailer School (NTTS) in Buffalo, N.Y. This month I followed up with NTTS President and Co-Founder Harry Kowalchyk, a former Marine corporal. “Since myself and fellow co-founder William Mocarski (also a former Marine corporal) established NTTS in 1971, we knew it was important to recruit veterans, active duty members transitioning to civilian life, and dependents of current service members. They are proven, well-disciplined operators that are doing very well in our programs.” NTTS has a high graduation rate, and, more importantly, a high employment rate for graduates. Between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, 91 percent of NTTS graduates got jobs in the trucking industry. Kowalchyk attributes this to the network at NTTS... Download the full article in PDF

This article appears in the March 2015 print edition of GI Jobs. Click here to visit GI Jobs for more info.

 

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CVTA Applauds Senator Bill Monning for Recognizing Need to Strengthen California Training Requirements for Commercial Drivers

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Today CVTA President Don Lefeve issued the following statement:

"On Tuesday, Senator Bill Monning (D-Carmel) introduced legislation aimed at establishing training requirements for commercial drivers in California. SB 344 requires those seeking a commercial driver’s license to complete a course of instruction from a commercial driving institution before they can be issued a license by the DMV and removes a cost exemption that currently enables CDL mills to avoid regulation.

“CVTA believes this legislation is a positive first step in establishing minimum driver training requirements in California. We believe, however, there are parts which can be strengthened as the legislative process unfolds. Specifically, we believe that the minimum training standards should be uniform for both schools and carriers. We look forward to working with Senator Monning and others to help improve driver training in California.”
 

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Working on an Effective Driver-Training Rule

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By Don Lefeve
President and CEO
Commercial Vehicle Training Association

This Opinion piece appears in the Feb. 23  print edition of Transport Topics. Click here to read the full article.

On Feb. 10, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration announced the list of industry participants for the Entry-Level Driver Training Advisory Committee. The first meeting will take place later this month. Stakeholders will gather around a table, discuss various ideas to establish minimum training requirements for future drivers and then attempt to write the regulation for these requirements. This process is called a negotiated rulemaking.

In this negotiated rulemaking, FMCSA selected 26 individuals representing various industries that are connected to trucking, including the Commercial Vehicle Training Association, to “negotiate” a proposed regulation. The other participants are made up of schools, trucking associations, bus associations, safety groups, enforcement groups, unions and a large carrier and an owner-operator. This diverse group has the challenge of formulating regulations surrounding entry-level training standards.

It will focus on the following topics:

  • Development of minimum training requirements for individuals applying for a commercial driver license for the first time or upgrading from one class of CDL to another.
  • Determining the amount of behind-the-wheel training and classroom instruction.
  • Gathering and providing data to quantify the costs and safety benefits of training.
  • Accreditation versus certification of entry-level driver training programs and schools.
  • Contents of driver-training curricula, including separate course modules for motorcoach and passenger carriers, as well as hazardous materials carriers.
  • Instructor qualifications and requirements.
  • A performance-based approach versus a minimum hours-of-training approach, as well as simulation training and special considerations.

For more than 20 years, the Department of Transportation has attempted to produce minimum training requirements for entry-level drivers. Prior attempts have failed to pass judicial scrutiny.

This Opinion piece appears in the Feb. 23  print edition of Transport Topics. Click here to read the full article.