Print

DOT Leaders’ Plans for Future Not Expected to Be Settled Until Early 2013

on .

By Michele Fuetsch
Staff Reporter, Transport Topics

The future leadership of the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is not expected to be settled until early 2013, according to officials with the agencies.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said in a speech to the Peoria Rotary Club in Illinois on Dec. 7 that he and President Obama will not discuss his future until the new year, the Peoria Journal Star reported.

When asked for further comment by TRANSPORT Topics, LaHood spokesman Justin Nisly said: “I don’t have anything to share beyond what the secretary has said publicly.”
LaHood said he and the president talked about the future “shortly after” the election and “will continue to-talk after the first of the year, and we’ll see where it takes us,” the Journal Star reported.

FMCSA Administrator Anne Ferro did not respond to requests for comment about her future plans.

However, FMCSA Deputy Administrator Bill Bronrott said in an e-mail to TT that Ferro and “other appointees at U.S. DOT serve at the pleasure of the president, and will speak with Secretary LaHood about second-term plans in the coming weeks.”

Ferro was nominated by Obama in 2009. She had been president of the Maryland Motor Truck Association and previously ran the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration.

She became the fourth permanent administrator of the truck-safety agency, which was officially established in 2000.

Ferro succeeded John Hill, who departed as part of the transition between the Bush and Obama administrations. Rose McMurray, FMCSA’s chief safety officer, served as acting administrator in the interim.

Before the president selected LaHood as DOT secretary in 2009, he was the congressman from Peoria for 14 years. He is currently the only Republican in Obama’s cabinet.

LaHood first brought up the issue of his tenure in October 2011, when he said he planned to leave the cabinet to go into the private sector and would not be serving in a second Obama administration.

In recent months, LaHood appeared to be backtracking, as when he told reporters ‘on Sept. 19 that he didn’t know “if I’ve -ever had a better job.”

At that time, he said he planned to talk to Obama after the election about his future as secretary.

Source: Transport Topics